Architecture brief jpgs

The best architecture seeks to elevate modern habitats and structures beyond their utilitarian purpose; an office building is therefore not just a place of business, but can be designed to reflect the entrepreneurial spirit contained within it.

Photography can magnify the latent beauty of these built spaces. By taking a building out of its surrounding context or by focusing on a structure’s specific feature, a photograph can offer a study of architecture’s geometrical DNA. The architectural landscape is vast and varied, and includes glass-clad skyscrapers, refurbished colonial mansions, places of worship both humble and ornate, and the odd public works project that defies conventional notions of good taste.

Key aspects to consider when shooting architecture include the time of day and the direction of the building. If the building faces east, for example, then the light will hit the building in the morning. When the building isn’t aesthetically pleasing the light becomes even more important, as you can use it to create a more interesting image. Weather can also dramatically strengthen a photograph; a stormy sky changes the whole atmosphere of a building or landscape. “Light,” as photographers say, “is God”.

Harrison and Abramovitz
Harrison and Abramovitz

Paul Bonatz 2

Paul Bonatz

Symmetry

Schuppe & Kremmer

Schuppe & Kremmer

Minoru Yamasaki

Minoru Yamasaki

Reflection

Von Gerkan

Von Gerkan

It can also be important to show how a space is utilised–including people and other environmental elements in the frame can add life to an image.Take this shot of the TWA terminal designed by Eero Saarinen. By shooting a partial of the terminal and including its foreground, midground and background, and by using either early morning or late afternoon light, the photographer has created an almost three-dimensional image, allowing us to feel as if we were actually standing on the staircase.

Eero Saarinen

Eero Saarinen

For its upcoming exhibition, The Print Room will focus on abstract architecture and is looking for bodies of work that can form a visual narrative out of architecture’s use of light, symmetry, balance, lines, shapes, textures, etc. The exhibition is open to all photographers, requirement being that all photographs are shot on film.

The Print Room aspires to build awareness and enhance appreciation for the visual arts, particularly in classical fine arts photography. Our specific emphasis and pride is to offer students an opportunity to learn to handle a traditional manual film camera, to process film and to print photographs in the classical way. Only with a foundation in classical photography techniques, can the photographer begin to approach photography as a fine art.

Email us: info@theprintroomkl.com

Architecture brief